Seattle Works

A blog that documents all things Seattle Works…and much much more!

Transforming nonprofit boards through leadership training December 11, 2013

Filed under: Lead,LeadNOW,The Bridge,Training,Uncategorized — seattleworks @ 12:30 pm
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Over the course of 6 months this year, we – in partnership with Bridge faculty member Julie Bianchi – developed and piloted a brand new leadership training program for individuals currently serving on a nonprofit board of directors.

Members of The Bridge 201 Pilot Cohort, June 2013

You may be asking yourself, “Why? You already have The Bridge to train board members.” That is true – but we saw a gap that needed to be filled. What’s the next step? You’ve joined a board, you’ve been very involved and are looking to grow by accepting a leadership role on the board. What do you do?

The Bridge 201 helps those who are taking on more leadership roles on a board. In this 6-hour training, participants gain valuable tools ranging from a refresher on the roles and responsibilities of board members to how adaptive leadership can transform your impact on the board. Incorporating activities that are specifically tailored for the adult learner, this innovative training breaks away from traditional lecture style training to provide a rich environment that encourages discussion and peer-to-peer learning.

Our inaugural cohort of Bridge 201 participants left the training saying:

“Wow! [The Bridge 201] really opened my eyes to more strategy and intention behind leadership.”
“Provided [me] a new and important lens for evaluating issues and creating an environment of change.”
“It’s great to have people who serve on boards share together.”

The Bridge 201 is not just a training, it is building a community of nonprofit board members that can be a resource to one-another as they continue to make an impact in the community. In addition to the training, the cohort is given access to a platform in which they can bounce ideas off each other, stay connected, ask questions and continue to learn.

So, what do graduates of The Bridge 201 walk away with? Fantastic question! The Bridge 201 is broken up into two, three-hour sessions (typically a Tue & Thu evening). The sessions are strategically broken up into modules that build upon each other. Here are some of the learning objectives that participants walk away with:

Session One

Participants apply the definition of adaptive leadership to real world examples; represented by adaptive vs. technical challenges in the world and society.

  • Define the characteristics and skills common to leaders and the key roles of board members.
  • Identify examples of adaptive leaders and challenges in your own experience.
  • Define the three modes of governance

Sessions Two

  • List the qualities of an adaptive organization and a culture of inquiry.
  • Apply what you’ve learned in a board room simulation to navigate a complex challenge.
  • Create three action items for how you will take what you learned back to your board.

The Bridge 201 is assisting in the transformation of nonprofit board leadership in the Seattle area. We’ve been working since our pilot session to perfect this program and make it something that we think is a “must-do” for any one who is taking on a leadership role on a board.

The next session of The Bridge 201 is Tue 1/14 & Thu 1/16, 6-9pm. Registration is currently open, sign up now! For more information, contact Ben@seattleworks.org. 

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Patrick Bradshaw thinks Seattlelites use Patagonia or North Face Jackets in the rain rather than umbrellas December 9, 2013

Patrick_Bradshaw_Headshot21. Name: Patrick Bradshaw

Neighborhood: Wallingford

Occupation: Marketing Operations Manager

Years in Seattle: 13

2. Where is your favorite place to go in Seattle?

Gas Works Park, anytime I am there it reminds me of why I love this city.

3. Your first interaction with Seattle Works was…?

Through Team Works, the first project I did was to help fix up the Rainier Valley Cultural Center.

4. What’s the best meal you’ve eaten in the Seattle area?

The best meal I have had in Seattle was Steak with lobster medallions at El Goucho.  However, a more reasonable place lately has been UNEEDA Burger in Fremont.

5. Are you involved with any other Seattle nonprofit organizations?

I serve on the Board of Directors for the North Helpline, which provides a food bank and emergency services to the people of North Seattle.

6. Which coffee shop do you most frequent?

Lighthouse Coffee or Lama G’s

7. What three words best describe your experience with Seattle Works?

Fun.  Memorable.  Community.

8. Mariners, Sounders, or Seahawks?

Seahawks

9. What is your most (or first) memorable volunteer experience?

The most memorable volunteer experience I have was taking inventory of a thrift shop on pieces of paper.  While not the most practical or well organized project it certainly provided some of the best memories.

10. What makes someone a Seattleite?

Someone who doesn’t use an umbrella on a rainy day, they just wear their North Face, Patagonia, etc jacket to stay dry.

This weekly 10 question profile is Seattle Works way of highlighting and saying THANK YOU to all that our volunteers, leaders, community partners, board members, committee members, etc do for our community! We’re asking the same 10 questions to various Seattle Works participants as a fun way to feature the different ways to be involved with Seattle Works and in Seattle.

Want to be profiled? Fill out this survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/5KP5CY3 and send a photo of yourself to info@seattleworks.org

P.S. In case you’re interested, the inspiration behind these interviews comes from NY Mag’s weekly blog post.

 

CommonWealth sends a check to DESC! December 4, 2013

Filed under: CommonWealth,Invest — seattleworks @ 12:39 pm
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CWFinal

Our Fall 2013 CommonWealth team worked together over the last three weeks to build their skills as donors–and learn about this round’s issue area of focus: housing and homelessness. Last night, after researching nearly 50 organizations working on the issue locally and statewide, the group decided to send their donation to DESC!

DESC is a Seattle-based organization that works to end the homelessness of vulnerable people, particularly those living with serious mental or addictive illnesses, by providing mental health and chemical dependency treatment, 279 emergency shelter beds, and nearly 800 units of permanent supportive housing that serve over 7,000 people each year.

From the beginning, the CommonWealth team wanted to support organizations that provde a wide range of services to address the root causes of homelessness. DESC emerged as a perfect match–the team was impressed  by the diversity of their programs, their collaborative approach and their impressive results. As the team said themselves, DESC serves “the people we see every day,” and “empowers them to be a part of the community.”

Thanks to our CommonWealth team for the time and energy they invested this round–we’re thrilled to send their donation of $1,200 to DESC this week!

 

President Obama to Millennials: I Want You to Help With Climate Change!

Filed under: Uncategorized — seattleworks @ 12:05 pm
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Christine McMullin, guest blogger– obama

With all the bad press about Millennials lately, you would think that we can barely get out of bed to confront the coffee pot in the morning, let alone make lasting change in the world.

There is one person, at least, who disagrees: President Obama.

In November, he specifically called out Millennials as the ones who would lead the charge in reducing climate change and environmental regulation in general. It’s the “leaders of the future” that he wants to engage, and he wants to engage them now.

Leading Change as a Millennial

From the executive order that the White House drew up, it’s more than a seat at the table that Millennials will get; it’s the chance to be part of the action.

Nuclear.power.plant.DukovanyObama recognizes that not all change has to come from the legislative branch (we’ve all been party to how that’s going) and seems to have decided that enacting change at the grass-roots and “bottom-up” level will be more effective.

What does this mean for Millennials? The chance to do exactly critics accuse us of: be part of the process. As Melia Ungson says, “…when Millennials are in positions of power, we know that climate change will be high on the agenda, and therefor understand that it is out generation that will reap the rewards or manage the clean-up of whatever actions we take or do not take in the coming months and years.”

How Can I Help?

Government officials seem to be waking up to the value in bringing us into the conversation. After all, as Millennials, we want to change the world. We want to volunteer for causes we care about, we want to do something, whether it’s giving money or time. See the Millennial Impact Report for a fascinating look at how our generation connects with causes: http://www.themillennialimpact.com/research-2012

So, to help, take up the charge! Engage with your favorite cause! Get your friends excited about it! Share news on social media!

The executive branch has realized the impact that we can make: “They [Millennials] are the leading edge of where the country is headed ideologically as well as demographically,” one senior White House aide said.

 

Lacey Patzer is new to Seattle but has found a home with Team Works December 2, 2013

Filed under: 10 Question Profile — seattleworks @ 10:15 am
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Lacey Patzer1. Name: Lacey Patzer

Neighborhood: Renton

Occupation: Program Coordinator at UW

Years in Seattle: 8 months

2. Where is your favorite place to go in Seattle?

Fremont

3. Your first interaction with Seattle Works was…?

I joined a Team Works team shortly after moving here, and I’m still on it!

4. What’s the best meal you’ve eaten in the Seattle area?

I LOVE Pie in Fremont!

5. Are you involved with any other Seattle nonprofit organizations?

I’m Communications Chair for Habitat Young Professionals, the YP affiliate of Habitat for Humanity of Seattle-King County.

6. Which coffee shop do you most frequent?

The Rotunda café on the first floor of the Health Sciences building at UW… I’m too lazy to go anywhere else

7. What three words best describe your experience with Seattle Works?

Fun, Laid-back, Difference-making (that counts, right?)

8. Mariners, Sounders, or Seahawks?

I don’t follow sports, but I really like the scarves that Sounders fans wear

9. What is your most (or first) memorable volunteer experience?

I think one of my first volunteer experiences was packing healthy dinners for people at a food shelter in my hometown… I barely remember it, so I was probably like 6 at the time and probably not very helpful.

10. What makes someone a Seattleite?

When you ask “why would you eat fried cheese?” and you are completely serious.

This weekly 10 question profile is Seattle Works way of highlighting and saying THANK YOU to all that our volunteers, leaders, community partners, board members, committee members, etc do for our community! We’re asking the same 10 questions to various Seattle Works participants as a fun way to feature the different ways to be involved with Seattle Works and in Seattle.

Want to be profiled? Fill out this survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/5KP5CY3 and send a photo of yourself to info@seattleworks.org

P.S. In case you’re interested, the inspiration behind these interviews comes from NY Mag’s weekly blog post.